How “BioShock” misrepresents Ayn Rand

When I first heard about Bioshock I was 14 and totally pissed off as a Halo fanboy, as Bioshock got nominated as game of the year. As I later borrowed it from a friend, I was fascinated. I wasn’t interested in politics (or any intellectual topic for that matter) yet, but even back then BioShock fascinated me due to its philosophical and society critical theme, which I never had seen or even cared about in a videogame.

Even years before I read Ayn Rands books and started to view myself as libertarian, I couldn’t help but agree with much Andrew Ryan says (not does!) in the game. Just remember for example this radio transmission in Arcadia:

“On the surface, I once bought a forest. The Parasites claimed that the land belonged to God, and demanded that I establish a public park there. Why? So the rabble could stand slack-jawed under the canopy and pretend that it was paradise earned. When Congress moved to nationalize my forest, I burnt it to the ground. God did not plant the seeds of this Arcadia; I did.”

Andrew Ryan radio message in the level “Arcadia – Farmer’s market”

The only thing I thought was „Rightly so!“.

Thanks to a blogger I frequently read, I later realized that Bioshock is based upon Rand and her ideas. Since then I’ve been more and more consciously informing myself about her philosophy. Even though I was neither interested nor informed about any of this stuff and Andrew Ryan, who is supposed to be a figure of virtue, is being portrayed as the villain as well as all of Rands ideas (free market, limited government, rational (!) self-interest) seem to be put in an intentionally bad light, Ryan’s/Rand’s ideas still managed to convince me for the most part. A good example of her view of how powerful and important ideas are.

And that’s the point where I need to clear out some common confusions, which the game unfortunately also seems to convey:

  1. When speaking of „selfishness“ or „egoism“ she does this always with the prefix „rational“, which is to show that she isn’t talking about a „murderous brute who tramples over piles of corpses to achieve his own ends, who cares for no living being and pursues nothing but the gratification of the mindless whims of any immediate moment.“ (The virtue of selfishness, p. 1), because she argues that this is not in a persons best (long-term) self-interest – only fair, honest trade with others is (trader principle). You could also just call it „Individualism“ and people are more likely to understand what you mean and probably agree with you. Why she insisted to use the word she used, I still don’t fully understand.
  2. Objectivism’s ethics are virtue ethics, which means it is more of a guideline to help people navigate through life and give them generalized instructions how to act in and evaluate certain situations. The „good“ is hereby what furthers your life and the „bad“ is what doesn’t. This means that when Rand calls something „evil“, an individual which has done „evil“ is not necessarily supposed to be ashamed and punished. She merely tries to say that this individual is hurting itself and should reconsider its values or course of action.
  3. Rand was a minarchist, not an anarchist. She saw the role of the state as limited to military, police and courts.

As far as I remember, Rapture had none of those, except a council of unelected members and cronies of Ryan. Also the speech at the beginning about „petty morality“ goes diametrically against objectivism’s ideas of a proper morality being a necessity for (a good) life.

Rapture is more anarchistic than minarchistic, since – and correct me if I’m wrong – it had no real law enforcement or other institutions other then the council and Ryan’s goons. Besides, Ryan eventually betrays all his principles and with each betrayal alienating the people of Rapture further and driving them into the arms of Atlas. The biggest betrayals being:

  1. the ignorance towards the enslavement of innocents in the Little Sister- and Big Daddy programs and the experiments done to them
  2. the nationalisation of his opponents company
  3. torture
  4. murder (e.g. the mother of Jack)
  5. ban on religion and ultimately
  6. robbing the people of their free will (how ever little was left of it)

And I bet there are much more examples. Somehow the game tries to show how Ryan’s ideas can’t work in reality while also showing at the same time what happens when he betrays those ideas, which just seems odd.

I do like the attempt to criticize the other (altruist-collectivist-)side in Bioshock 2 though. Naturally it can’t compete with the story of the first, but it’s still interesting. But I had and still have a big problem with the character of Sofia Lamb, because I find it very hard to believe that Ryan – a self-made billionaire with very strong political convictions – is such a bad judge of character and dumb enough not to realize what kind of person Lamb is. Just read in the novel how cautiously Ryan recruits people like Bill McDonagh and then tell me it isn’t odd that he recruits his arch-nemesis, just because he mistook some statements of her…

Regarding Jack I must say that I normally don’t like silent protagonists, but in this game it at least made some kind of sense. Though I wished he started talking or making his own decisions after being freed from Fontaine’s control. But instead you’ve basically traded Fontaine for Tannenbaum and followed her orders/instructions instead.

Luke, the uploader of the video, is also right about the moral choices regarding the little sisters. I think it doesn’t make a big difference in the long run. If you are a completionist and want every upgrade and plasmid, you have to rescue/heal the sisters to get all the necessary adam. But normal players will hardly notice any difference. Which is a shame, because this whole morality system could have so effectively shown the difference between the short-sighted recklessness normally associated with selfishness and the rational self-interest Rand was talking about, which has it’s eye on the long-term consequences.

BioShock is one of the best games ever made. The setting, the atmosphere, the gameplay and many, many other things make it a modern classic. And even though the philopsophical critique of Rand’s ideas is incoherent and distorting, it raises the players interest and, in my case, even make you admire the alleged villain or rather his philosophy.

Ayn Rand: What are „Rights“?

“Rights” are a moral concept—the concept that provides a logical transition from the principles guiding an individual’s actions to the principles guiding his relationship with others—the concept that preserves and protects individual morality in a social context—the link between the moral code of a man and the legal code of a society, between ethics and politics. Individual rights are the means of subordinating society to moral law.
[…]
Bear in mind that the right to property is a right to action, like all the others: it is not the right to an object, but to the action and the consequences of producing or earning that object. It is not a guarantee that a man will earn any property, but only a guarantee that he will own it if he earns it. It is the right to gain, to keep, to use and to dispose of material values.

Ayn Rand, The Virtue of Selfishness

“Rechte” sind ein moralisches Konzept – das Konzept, das einen logischen Übergang von den Prinzipien, die das Handeln eines Individuums leiten, zu den Prinzipien, die sein Verhältnis zu anderen leiten – das Konzept, das die individuelle Moral in einem sozialen Kontext bewahrt und schützt – die Verbindung zwischen dem Moralkodex von einem Mann und dem Rechtskodex einer Gesellschaft, zwischen Ethik und Politik. Individuelle Rechte sind das Mittel, um die Gesellschaft dem moralischen Recht zu unterwerfen.
[…]
Denken Sie daran, dass das Recht auf Eigentum wie alle anderen auch ein Recht auf Handlung ist: Es ist nicht das Recht auf einen Gegenstand, sondern auf die Handlung und die Folgen der Herstellung oder des Erwerbs dieses Gegenstandes. Es ist keine Garantie, dass ein Mann Eigentum verdient, sondern nur eine Garantie, dass er es besitzt, wenn er es verdient. Es ist das Recht, materielle Werte zu erlangen, zu behalten, zu nutzen und darüber zu verfügen.

Ayn Rand, Die Tugend des Egoismus

BioShock: Objektivismus und Minimalstaat

Andrew Ryan ist der Gründer der utopischen Unterwasserstadt Rapture im Shooter “BioShock” und soll eine Anspielung und Kritik zu Ayn Rand und ihren Ideen sein. Wüsste ich nicht wie korrupt und wahnsinnig er am Ende würde, ich würde ihn wählen. Anfangs hatte er ja auch noch respektable Ideale, nur die Umsetzung in Rapture war dann ja ziemlich fragwürdig. Aus seiner Ideologie heraus konnte er natürlich nicht gegen Fontaine/Atlas vorgehen, aber es kann doch auch nicht im Interesse einer Gesellschaft sein, sich von einem Usurpator unterwandern zu lassen. Wenn die eigenen Prinzipien einem Schaden, sollte man sie noch mal überdenken. Ryan hat sich geweigert dies zu tun und hat sich stattdessen alles zurecht rationalisiert. Bis er dann völlig durchdrehte und zum Diktator und Mörder mutierte.

Auch wenn das Spiel wahrscheinlich eine Kritik am Objektivismus und Minimalstaat sein soll, zeigt es eigentlich eher was in einem anarcho-kapitalistischen System passieren würde (ich meine Luft privatisieren? Ernsthaft?). Egal wie ich mich drehe und wende, ich komme immer wieder zu dem Schluss, dass ein Minimalstaat in Form einer durch eine Verfassung begrenzten Demokratie mit einer Regierung die den Menschen dient (nicht umgekehrt) das beste System zum Schutz von Individuellen Rechten ist.

Die große Frage ist halt: Wie, wenn überhaupt, geht strong government ohne big government? Was muss ein Minimalstaat (zusätzlich zu Polizei, Militär und Gerichten wie Ayn Rand es befürwortete) leisten können/dürfen, um die Rechte der Einwohner zu schützen* und wie begrenzt muss er gleichzeitig sein, dass er sich nicht zu einem überregulierenden, paternalistisch-autoritären Umverteilungs-Wohlfahrtsstaat wie Deutschland heutzutage entwickelt?

Auch wenn es pessimistisch klingt: Es ist wahrscheinlich eine Utopie zu denken, man könnte sowas auf ewig verhindern, aber man kann diesen Prozess durch eine gute Verfassung zumindest verlangsamen und es den Parasiten, Dirigisten, Opportunisten usw. erheblich erschweren.

We are a nation that has a government - not the other way around. And this makes us special among the nations of the earth.

-- President Ronald Reagan

Zwar ist auch Amerika mittlerweile ein reines Bürokratiemonster mit diversen Regulierungsbehörden. Aber man vergleiche nur mal die USA, ein explizit auf minarchistischen Prinzipien gegründetes Land, mit Deutschland, welches sozialistische Klauseln wie Art. 14 (2) GG aufweist („Eigentum verpflichtet“) in der Hinsicht, wie lange es gedauert hat, bis sie diesen Zustand erreichten: USA 150 Jahre und Deutschland 70 Jahre (sogar nur 30 Jahre im Falle Ost-Deutschlands). Und die USA haben immer noch sehr viel größeren Respekt vor individueller Freiheit, Unternehmertum usw.

Ich finde BioShock ist eine perfekte case-study für Politikwissenschaftler. Ich würde gerne mal eine in die Tiefe gehende Analyse dazu sehen. Auch gerne von Objektivisten, um zu erfahren, inwieweit Rapture überhaupt Ayn Rands tatsächliche Ideale abbildet (nicht viel schätze ich mal). Der einzige mir bekannte deutsche Objektivist Andreas Müller hat das Spiel zwar ein paar mal erwähnt, aber ist leider nicht weiter darauf eingegangen.

Edit: Herr Müller hat jetzt auch eine kleine Analyse zu Rapture geschrieben: Warum Rapture gescheitert ist.


*Können zb. auch wie im Fall BioShock Regeln für Werbung und Entwicklung gefährlicher Technologien aufgestellt werden, um die Leute vor Plasmidmissbrauch zu schützen? Immerhin zerstörte dieser ihre Vernunft und ihre Menschlichkeit, also die Grundlagen der Fähigkeit überhaupt Träger von Rechten sein zu können.

What is consciousness?

Consciousness is a philosophical and scientific axiom. It requires a brain. It is real but not material. It is our means of knowing reality (though existence is the primary axiom). The conceptual (rational) faculty builds on the material provided by the senses. Consciousness as a faculty includes the conscious mind and material stored in the subconscious, which can become conscious. Both aspects work together, with the conscious mind being active and the subconscious relatively passive. Reason is fallible and requires an epistemology and the choice to expend effort. Consciousness is our main means of survival and of human progress.

Edwin A. Locke, The Illusion of Determinism

This is a nice little summary of the objectivist view of consciousness and free will. I share this view, but I have to say that I still think that the term “free will” is misleading and redundant.

First: People tend to understand the word “free” in an anarchist kind of sense (just as the free-market economy is often understood as anarchism), as if the will was completely detached from existence, i.e. context-free. That this is not the case, and that this circumstance is no proof of determinism, is what Edwin Locke explains in the book quoted above.

Second: It is simply unnecessary to put the adjective “free” before the term “will.” Through our capacity for conceptual thinking, we are able to make choices, so, unlike animals, we can consciously choose between alternative actions. This constitutes our freedom, because we are not completely determined by causality.

Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed.

Francis Bacon, Novum Organum

But we have to consciously set and pursue goals based on a moral code. That’s our will. In other words: The will is free by definition, otherwise it would not be will.

This also raises the exciting question of whether AI can ever develop a consciousness without (free) will (if it is even possible to produce a consciousness or an awareness process with algorithms).

Ayn Rand: Moral cannibalism


„The moral cannibalism of all hedonist and altruist doctrines lies in the premise that the happiness of one man necessitates the injury of another.”

Ayn Rand, The Virtue of Selfishness

“Der moralische Kannibalismus aller hedonistischen und altruistischen Lehren liegt in der Prämisse, dass das Glück des Einen das Leid des anderen bedingt.”

Ayn Rand, Die Tugend des Egoismus

Very important quote. That’s the premise of all socialist/statist ideologies which needs to be challenged. Too many people honestly believe that there is no other way to become a successful person like Steve Jobs or Jeff Bezos without “exploiting” others.

But socialism does not work (at least not then, when you have a modicum of self-esteem and don’t want to live as a drone on a sub-human level). Thus they enjoy every one of capitalisms products.
Hence their guilt, hence their self-hate, hence their hate on humanity, hence their hatred for every big company, free-market advocates and capitalism itself – all because they can’t stick to their own principles (how could they?).

One can be free in his/hers pursuit of happiness and material wealth without hurting others – but only in a free society under the rule of law which is based on a strict code of individualism (rational self-interest) and liberalism.

Picture source: fee.org

Ayn Rand about Americas success

“America’s abundance was not created by public sacrifices to “the common good,” but by the productive genius of free men who pursued their own personal interests and the making of their own private fortunes. They did not starve the people to pay for America’s industrialization. They gave the people better jobs, higher wages, and cheaper goods with every new machine they invented, with every scientific discovery or technological advance—and thus the whole country was moving forward and profiting, not suffering, every step of the way. Do not, however, make the error of reversing cause and effect: the good of the country was made possible precisely by the fact that it was not forced on anyone as a moral goal or duty; it was merely an effect; the cause was a man’s right to pursue his own good. It is this right—not its consequences—that represents the moral justification of capitalism.

– Ayn Rand, Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal

“Amerikas Überfluss wurde nicht durch öffentliche Opfer für das “Gemeinwohl” geschaffen, sondern durch das produktive Genie freier Männer, die ihre eigenen persönlichen Interessen verfolgten und ihr eigenes privates Vermögen machten. Sie zahlten nicht den Preis für die Industrialisierung Amerikas. Sie gaben den Menschen bessere Jobs, höhere Löhne und billigere Waren mit jeder neuen Maschine, die sie erfanden, mit jeder wissenschaftlichen Entdeckung oder technischem Fortschritt – und so bewegte sich das ganze Land vorwärts und profitierte, statt zu leiden, jeden Schritt des Weges. Machen Sie jedoch nicht den Fehler, Ursache und Wirkung umzukehren: das Wohl des Landes, wurde exakt durch die Tatsache möglich, dass es niemandem als moralisches Ziel oder Pflicht aufgezwungen wurde; es war nur eine Wirkung; die Ursache war das Recht eines Menschen, sein eigenes Wohl zu verfolgen. Dieses Recht, nicht seine Konsequenzen, repräsentiert die moralische Rechtfertigung des Kapitalismus.

– Ayn Rand, Kapitalismus: Das unbekannte Ideal

“In Amerika wurden keine menschlichen Anstrengungen und keine materiellen Ressourcen für öffentliche Denkmäler und öffentliche Projekte enteignet. Sie wurden für den Fortschritt des privaten, persönlichen, individuellen Wohlergehens individueller Bürger ausgegeben. Amerikas Größe liegt in der Tatsache, dass seine wirklichen Monumente nicht öffentlich sind. Die Skyline von New York ist ein Denkmal von solcher Größe, dass die Pyramiden oder die Paläste sie nie erreichen oder übertreffen können. Doch Amerikas Wolkenkratzer wurden weder durch öffentliche Mittel noch für öffentliche Zwecke erbaut: Sie wurden erbaut durch die Energie, die Initiative und den Wohlstand von privaten Individuen für persönlichen Profit. Und anstatt das Volk zu verarmen, haben diese Wolkenkratzer, während sie selbst höher und höher wuchsen, den Lebensstandard gehoben – den der Einwohner der Slums mit eingeschlossen, die im Vergleich zum Leben eines ägyptischen Sklaven oder eines modernen sowjetischen Arbeiters ein luxuriöses Leben führen. Das ist der Unterschied zwischen Kapitalismus und Sozialismus – sowohl in der Theorie als auch in der Praxis.”

– Ayn Rand, Die Tugend des Egoismus

“In America, human effort and material resources were not expropriated for public monuments and public projects, but were spent on the progress of the private, personal, individual well-being of individual citizens. America’s greatness lies in the fact that her actual monuments are not public. The skyline of New York is a monument of a splendor that no pyramids or palaces will ever equal or approach. But America’s skyscrapers were not built by public funds nor for a public purpose: they were built by the energy, initiative and wealth of private individuals for personal profit. And, instead of impoverishing the people, these skyscrapers, as they rose higher and higher, kept raising the people’s standard of living—including the inhabitants of the slums, who lead a life of luxury compared to the life of an ancient Egyptian slave or of a modern Soviet Socialist worker. Such is the difference—both in theory and practice—between capitalism and socialism.”

– Ayn Rand, The Virtue of Selfishness

Picture source: fee.org